do you think there is another earth like planet?

1 Human Warrior
0
Given the amount of galaxies, star systems and planets. I would say there's millions/billions Earth-like planets.

If we're talking about extraterrestrial life - definitely. Remember that Earth atmosphere is not the only one capable sustain life. Life can exist in extreme conditions and what's extreme for us, don't have to be extreme for something/someone else.

We are carbon based life form right? Every single living organism on Earth is carbon based. What if there's life form based on some other element? Wouldn't that be awesome?

As for intelligent life, that's complete different story.


I'd just like to point out again that the conditions that life arose under on this planet would be extreme for us. Once you have life, any life, it tends to shift the conditions towards being able to sustain even more life (even if you have situations like the "oxygen poisoning" event that killed of most life until some arose to take advantage of it).

"To have a lot of advanced life it's vitally important that !@#$ happens" <- quote from somewhere

As for non-carbon life. It's actually not too likely. This is down to chemistry, as carbon very willingly bonds into chains. It's sort of a .. ehm.. %^-* of an atom that ain't very picky about what it takes along. Thus it allows for alot of random chemistry to happen if the materials are around (and if there's a reasonable amount of heat that's a pluss too).

Silicon based life is hypotethically possible, but much harder to pull off. Though life based on silicon might be capable of popping up under conditions that wouldn't let carbon based life happen.

Though my bet on the most likely life we would ever be to meet would be robotic or some techno-organic hybrid. Ie, what a very advanced civilisation, that couldn't simply ignore Einstein, would create to explore the universe.
Reply Quote
85 Undead Warlock
11775
There is currently a project going on to create life from metals rather than carbon, how they plan on doing that I have no idea but we will see ^^.

Even if carbon based life is the only sort it should not be much of an issue, we already have life on earth that 'respires' using sulphur rather than oxygen, which opens up a few more avenues for life to form.
Reply Quote
1 Human Warrior
0
There is currently a project going on to create life from metals rather than carbon, how they plan on doing that I have no idea but we will see ^^.

Even if carbon based life is the only sort it should not be much of an issue, we already have life on earth that 'respires' using sulphur rather than oxygen, which opens up a few more avenues for life to form.


Just to point out (again), life using oxygen is a NEW thing on this planet. For most of lifes existence oxygen wasn't available in the atmosphere. All oxygen produced for eons reacted (oxidied) with the unbonded minerals in our upper crust, like iron and aluminium, creating many of the types of minerals that we now walk around on (and very often mine to get to those minerals again, as many ores are in the form of oxides).

Thus life surviving without oxygen is not at all some new or shocking discovery. And to say it opens up "new avenues for life to form" is putting it entirely on it's head as life forming in an oxygen atmosphere is a nigh impossibility (you need life to produce free o2), and life on earth certainly came to be in an atmosphere composed very very much different from the one we have today.
Reply Quote
85 Orc Shaman
5075
Why is this relevant? Australia isn't nearly full yet.
Reply Quote
1 Human Warrior
0
11/10/2011 23:44Posted by Despicable
Why is this relevant? Australia isn't nearly full yet.


They were asking about a colonizable eden type planet, not a prison planet.
Reply Quote
90 Dwarf Warrior
2800
Hi guys, yes there are, but the closest to us and from where they came our creators the Anunnaki/Nephilim/Gods, is called Nibiru/Netheru and is located just beyond our Sun, a twin planet of our Earth. Nibiru comes close to Earth every 3600 years, and maybe that next time will be on December the 21th 2012 with the arrival of the yearly Winter Solstice.
Reply Quote
85 Undead Warlock
11775


Just to point out (again), life using oxygen is a NEW thing on this planet. For most of lifes existence oxygen wasn't available in the atmosphere. All oxygen produced for eons reacted (oxidied) with the unbonded minerals in our upper crust, like iron and aluminium, creating many of the types of minerals that we now walk around on (and very often mine to get to those minerals again, as many ores are in the form of oxides).

Thus life surviving without oxygen is not at all some new or shocking discovery. And to say it opens up "new avenues for life to form" is putting it entirely on it's head as life forming in an oxygen atmosphere is a nigh impossibility (you need life to produce free o2), and life on earth certainly came to be in an atmosphere composed very very much different from the one we have today.


I never said new avenues, you made up that quote.
Reply Quote
90 Night Elf Druid
0
Yes but that only works if the universe didn't come from an initial Big Bang, which is the current theory. Infinite mass crammed into a finite space during expansion would cause it to collapse.


During the big bang we had the inflation period. Space itself expanded faster than c at a speed wich was anything between fast and infinite.

Thus we have the same situation where we have a limit of mass to infinity counteracted by a limit of velocity to infinity.

Also, realize that mass did not excist in its current form in those very first planck seconds of our universe. It was all energy and forces.


I suck at physics, but I'm curious...if space itself expanded faster than the speed of light during the inflation period, how did the speed of light become the 'speed limit' of the universe? Did the laws of physics as we know them not instantiate until after the expansion period, when the big bang had already occurred? Or is it then mass which makes the speed of light the limit?

I'm just askin' because you seem to know, and I don't. :)
Edited by Unicornis on 28/10/2011 12:49 BST
Reply Quote
1 Human Warrior
0
27/10/2011 20:08Posted by Demostravius
I never said new avenues, you made up that quote.


"Even if carbon based life is the only sort it should not be much of an issue, we already have life on earth that 'respires' using sulphur rather than oxygen, which opens up a few more avenues for life to form"

The only logical conclusion from that quote is that you think having something respirate with something else than oxygen is a different (ie, new) way for life to appear compared to how we've known (or atleast as far as our knowledge goes) life to form on the earth.

Which is my point, it didn't. Free oxygen wasn't (and couldn't have been) available in the young earths atmosphere.

But half a point for trying to evade the point with semantics.
Reply Quote
1 Human Warrior
0
27/10/2011 02:02Posted by Warthunder
Hi guys, yes there are, but the closest to us and from where they came our creators the Anunnaki/Nephilim/Gods, is called Nibiru/Netheru and is located just beyond our Sun, a twin planet of our Earth. Nibiru comes close to Earth every 3600 years, and maybe that next time will be on December the 21th 2012 with the arrival of the yearly Winter Solstice.


For your sake I really really hope you're trolling.
Reply Quote
1 Human Warrior
0
28/10/2011 12:49Posted by Unicornis


During the big bang we had the inflation period. Space itself expanded faster than c at a speed wich was anything between fast and infinite.

Thus we have the same situation where we have a limit of mass to infinity counteracted by a limit of velocity to infinity.

Also, realize that mass did not excist in its current form in those very first planck seconds of our universe. It was all energy and forces.


I suck at physics, but I'm curious...if space itself expanded faster than the speed of light during the inflation period, how did the speed of light become the 'speed limit' of the universe? Did the laws of physics as we know them not instantiate until after the expansion period, when the big bang had already occurred? Or is it then mass which makes the speed of light the limit?

I'm just askin' because you seem to know, and I don't. :)


Relativity doesn't allow for anything traveling faster than light. However it does allow for space itself to expand faster than light.
Reply Quote
90 Night Elf Druid
0


I suck at physics, but I'm curious...if space itself expanded faster than the speed of light during the inflation period, how did the speed of light become the 'speed limit' of the universe? Did the laws of physics as we know them not instantiate until after the expansion period, when the big bang had already occurred? Or is it then mass which makes the speed of light the limit?

I'm just askin' because you seem to know, and I don't. :)


Relativity doesn't allow for anything traveling faster than light. However it does allow for space itself to expand faster than light.


Really? That is fascinating - why isn't space itself subject to the same constraints?

Reply Quote
90 Worgen Druid
12735


Relativity doesn't allow for anything traveling faster than light. However it does allow for space itself to expand faster than light.


Really? That is fascinating - why isn't space itself subject to the same constraints?

I would guess that that's a question that isn't really possible to answer with any degree of certainty, but I would assume that it's due to expanding space expanding in to "nothingness" where the laws of physics don't exist, as nothing exists.
Reply Quote
85 Human Paladin
7060
Would be logical, considering the size of the know universe, to think there would be loads of earth-like planets with intelligent life on them.

Reply Quote
85 Undead Warlock
11775
Well ttbank there is no macro life that respires anything other than oxygen, and while I did not mention macro life as we where discussing an "Earth like" planet I assumed it was obvious. My mistake for not explaining it..

Relativity doesn't allow for anything traveling faster than light. However it does allow for space itself to expand faster than light.


Thats not strictly true, it just doesn't let anything cross the light barrier. Should something begin going faster than the speed of light nothing bad happens. This is of course theoretical but there is nothing in relativity preventing it.

I am not sure exactly why space can expand faster but seeing as it's just streching rather than moving across something, perhaps that is why?
Reply Quote
86 Blood Elf Mage
10835
Who knows if relativity will even hold up in a cpl hundred years?

Ofc for us we couldn't imagine that it could be faulty, but neither could medieval people think they were mistaken that the earth was flat and europe/asia/afrika was all there is.
Reply Quote
80 Human Mage
6155
20/09/2011 20:01Posted by Chemow
The question is what were before the big bang?


Yeah and you know what?If you answer this one,some Swedish guys will give you a nice cookie.True story.

Reply Quote
80 Human Mage
6155
31/10/2011 18:06Posted by Demostravius
I am not sure exactly why space can expand faster but seeing as it's just streching rather than moving across something, perhaps that is why?


There is no such theoretical constraint,dictated by Special Relativity(Contrary to what applies to objects),when space itself is expanding.

Reply Quote
1 Human Warrior
0
31/10/2011 18:06Posted by Demostravius
Well ttbank there is no macro life that respires anything other than oxygen, and while I did not mention macro life as we where discussing an "Earth like" planet I assumed it was obvious. My mistake for not explaining it..


True enough. But the point as getting back to the original thread subject is, we really first need to define what "earth like" is, because defining it as something close to what we're living on now would mean the earth itself wouldn't have been earth like for most of it's existance.

Another question would be "is photosyntesis and thus an oxygen atmosphere and then oxygen breathers an easy pathway to advanced life, or are there others?".

My bet is.. it's an easy and likely path (like carbon chemistry), if nothing else then merely due to how common the molecules needed are.
Reply Quote
85 Undead Warlock
11775


There is no such theoretical constraint,dictated by Special Relativity(Contrary to what applies to objects),when space itself is expanding.


But why?
Reply Quote

Please report any Code of Conduct violations, including:

Threats of violence. We take these seriously and will alert the proper authorities.

Posts containing personal information about other players. This includes physical addresses, e-mail addresses, phone numbers, and inappropriate photos and/or videos.

Harassing or discriminatory language. This will not be tolerated.

Forums Code of Conduct

Report Post # written by

Reason
Explain (256 characters max)
Submit Cancel

Reported!

[Close]