Working where the magic happens

General
Perhaps this thread might be a bit off topic, but I figured why not talk about it.

I am not a wow veteran like most of the people here, but I love video games as much as the next guy (perhaps even more). It is hard for me to calculate when exactly I stated playing games, but I would say that I started when I was 9 and I got my PS 1 with the demo CD. Now at the age of 20 I still love gaming and I will probably play until I am a grumpy old bastard X)

When people ask someone what do they want to do in life, you will hear a lot of different responses. My answer would be that I am a gamer and that I would happily work anywhere where there was something related about games.

I will probably never get a job in a company like Blizzard, because I don't have the requirements, however a guy can still dream. Just imagine going to the place where the good folks of Blizzard are working on wow. Witnessing a worker with only an idea in his mind creating something with the help of his team that will be seen by millions of people world wide. It might be a new design for a boss, a new dungeon, a certain class spell, perhaps even something like a lovable NPC (I am looking at you Zen'Kiki).

How about visiting the Starcraft 2 department? Seeing the developers creating new units for the Zerg/Terran/Protoss with interesting new abilities that improve both the strategic and fun side of this RTS game.

Moving to the Diablo 3 where the developers are perfecting the classes to deal more efficiently with the horrors known as the elite packs, not to mention creating new weapons and armor.

Then we have the forums, where the Blues try to keep things in order (Seems a bit like an impossible task sometimes), the customer support where they try to help players with the issues that might occur during the players game time and perhaps a lot of other places that make Blizzard what it is today.

Though it may never happen, I would be proud when I could say to people that I work for a gaming company, even if I would only be something like a coffee boy there.

What about you? Did you ever wish to work for a company that made one of the games you play?
When I was a kid playing WC1 and D1 on PS1 I wanted to be an archaeologist, and if that didn't go as planned, I would work at Blizzard and get paid for playing (Yes, that is what I thought when I was a kid)

None checked out tho :-/
14/08/2012 14:32Posted by Forumguy
I am not a wow veteran like most of the people here, but I love video games as much as the next guy (perhaps even more). It is hard for me to calculate when exactly I stated playing games, but I would say that I started when I was 9 and I got my PS 1 with the demo CD. Now at the age of 20 I still love gaming and I will probably play until I am a grumpy old bastard X)
I took this game up when I was 52 and already a grumpy old bastard. :)
I'd love to work for a company like Blizzard, even though I'll never have the right qualifications or anything to do so. Then I see images of Google HQ and stuff with all their slides and wacky work rooms and stuff, and I find myself thinking 'I don't care what job I get, I just want to work somewhere that looks like that'.
The qualifications you mention depend entirely on the position you strive for. We have a jobs page, take a look and see the kind of positions we have vacant right now and be sure to check back often for updates :)

http://eu.blizzard.com/en-gb/company/careers/index.html
Ive been also playing World of Warcraft since came out.I can say i have a lot of experience with the game.To be honest i was not all time an end game raider but i was enjoying the game.Doing quests,maybe some rp and also the fun of helping my guild mates:)
Working for a company like blizzard will be a dream to come true for me-maybe like a representative for my fellow country players-.
I have seen the places blizzard employees work and also i have talk with some about the great atmosphere there...But to be honest is hard...The chance Blizzard to open a new spot is low but i keep dreaming for a job like that.Working for games is something i dream for!

The qualifications you mention depend entirely on the position you strive for. We have a jobs page, take a look and see the kind of positions we have vacant right now and be sure to check back often for updates :)
http://eu.blizzard.com/en-gb/company/careers/index.html


I have the qualifications for a QA analyst or Game representatives for my language..Open a spot and i will make an application:P
Make my dreams come true Tarkalus:)
Why has the OP his post been reported ?
14/08/2012 15:06Posted by Esmirald
Why has the OP his post been reported ?


Probably because it's off topic. Seems to be ok today though :)
14/08/2012 14:32Posted by Forumguy
I will probably never get a job in a company like Blizzard, because I don't have the requirements


You can apply to become a Game Master, the requirements for that are like: be friendly, love to help people, basic understanding of the English language
It would only cost you your soul and every ounce of free will you have.
Knowing myself, I could NEVER work on something I use, or I have personal connection with.

But I noticed I didn't qualify for any of the jobs in EU, but at least 5-6 in the US... so.. do anyone know how hard it is to live in the US? :P
14/08/2012 14:32Posted by Forumguy
What about you? Did you ever wish to work for a company that made one of the games you play?

Been there, done that, got the t-shirt (literally. All I have left from that job experience is a funcom t-shirt).

I worked as a programmer on age of conan, where my most memorable contribution was my participation in a technical evaluation that resulted in the drawing of a penìs being present somewhere in the retail client data.

That's the only project I left before the end (the release was pushed back for a whole extra year after I left), leading me to discover what is really the meaning of "additional programmer" and such in game credits: those are the people who left before the end of the project and are thus relegated to a ghetto section of the credits by the people who are still there (funnily the "additional" programmers in age of conan include people who held such important roles as lead programmer or the people who wrote most of the rendering engine or the networking code)

I worked for other game companies too but since those made winnie the pooh games or other crappy license games they don't really count as working for companies that made games I play.

Video game jobs aren't really as glamorous as they sound as a programmer if you like to write clean and reusable code (which I do).

There's a lot of pressure just like with any other boring software project because management want both the project to be on time, cheap and free of bugs. They take advantage of "look how lucky you are to work on vidya games" to wrestle an insane amount of unpaid extra time from you.

After a while you figure that you may just as well work on business applications, at least there they can't appeal to your tremendous passion for the final product to make you work harder.

And to the OP you mentioned GMs but those are even lower than testers in the food chain. They're basically in-house end users of the products and are generally viewed by the development team as barely less clueless than the players.
14/08/2012 14:32Posted by Forumguy
How about visiting the Starcraft 2 department? Seeing the developers creating new units for the Zerg/Terran/Protoss with interesting new abilities that improve both the strategic and fun side of this RTS game.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o_h6AEAlFIY

Yeeaaa....

:P
The qualifications you mention depend entirely on the position you strive for. We have a jobs page, take a look and see the kind of positions we have vacant right now and be sure to check back often for updates :)


Somehow I doubt there will ever be a position open for an English Language degree wielding bossy boots. :P

edit: with bonus 'death glare' ability.

I'm a real catch.
14/08/2012 14:32Posted by Forumguy
What about you? Did you ever wish to work for a company that made one of the games you play?
Despite the fact that I have been playing the occasional computer game since the 8 bit days, my view on computing used to be more focused on the "serious" stuff. I have been working as a software engineer for quite a while. From the mundane (programming) over the specialized (performance tuning) all the way to the abstract (algorithms research). It wasn't before I came across MUDs ("Multi User Dungeons"), the text based predecessors of modern MMOs, that I began to dabble a bit in game design. But when I left the MUDs, that faded from my mind again.

Years later, I was drawn to WoW, played it from European release, on this very character here. First few years I was so taken by the game that I didn't give much thought to the machinery that was running it, or to the work process that had created it. It wasn't until shortly before TBC that I could no longer suspend my disbelief, and my love for the game got a few cracks.

Then came TBC and I was sucked in another time. But my curiosity had been piqued, and those seeds were growing. Until one day, for the umpteenth time in beautiful Kharazan, I looked at my screen and rather than a haunted ruin, I saw scaffolding and props. The metaphorical green glyphs were raining down the walls - it was an awakening not unlike that in The Matrix (on a much smaller scale). WoW hasn't been the same for me since.

I have been giving serious thought to the design of virtual worlds ever since, and that perspective has even changed my view of the real world. I began to take a more active role on Blizzard's forums here (or rather, the old forums before here). In a very loose sense, I have already done a little bit of designing for WoW, since some of my insights and suggestions have been picked up by the blues and have manifested as functionality/mechanic/content in the live game.

Nevertheless, applying for a job at Blizzard is not an easy decision. You see, there are roughly only three ways of doing great things:

a) Unknowingly:
That's why so many creators say with hindsight: "If we had known what we were getting ourselves into, we would've never dared."

b) With arrogance:
Those fortunate few who go through a) above, and then hurry on before learning enough from their past success.

c) Afraid, very afraid:
Those who do have a rather good idea of what they are getting themselves into.

Right now, applying to Blizzard for an upper tier design position is like volunteering to become the foster parent of ten million kids (or maybe just nine million, so much simpler!). They all want to be pleased, they all deserve to be, but some of them are terrible brats, and an unlucky few might in fact not have any positive outlook in life outside of WoW. That's a lot of responsibility.

And if that wasn't enough, there's all the shareholders who finance this whole endeavour. They have no clue about designing virtual worlds, often not even about playing in virtual worlds, but they do want to see return on their investment. That's a lot of responsibility.

And if that wasn't enough, the competing game studios are slowly beginning to wise up. After droves of failed WoW clones, the first truly new, evolutionary improvements and advancements of the MMO genre are finally coming to market (with GW2 the hottest hype at the time of this writing). Sooner or later, one of those upstarts is going to leave a permanent dent in WoW's subscriber numbers. And then the shareholders might panic. Despite this pressure, the only way forward then is to pick up the gauntlet, and out-design the competition with an even better game. That's a lot of responsibility.

And if that wasn't enough, during all of this, the players dedicate part of their life to this virtual world you helped create. They all vote with their wallets, but have no direct influence. The designers must anticipate the wishes of the players. The designers must give something back to the players that can meaningfully fill that part of the player's lives. After years and years of continued play, claiming that it is only a game is a cheap excuse. The designers have to provide more meaning than that. That's a lot of responsibility.
14/08/2012 15:51Posted by Jito
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o_h6AEAlFIY


Liked just because he has a Pandaren hat.
14/08/2012 16:01Posted by Lisanna
Somehow I doubt there will ever be a position open for an English Language degree wielding bossy boots. :P


If you can say "would you like fries with that?" there is. ;)

Anyway back on subject I have to agree with Eleris, it's not exciting as people think, you code other peoples models and sometimes if you are lucky get a placement on a team that actually does something exciting, like the actual ideas development. I left to work for an ISP, which surprisingly I find more satisfying.
When I think of Blizzard employes it pops on my mind them in free time with doomhammers and frostmourne at hands making warcraft in the offices.
14/08/2012 19:44Posted by Edaly
When I think of Blizzard employes it pops on my mind them in free time with doomhammers and frostmourne at hands making warcraft in the offices.

They do have a Lich King statue with a Frostmourne in the Paris headquarters. :p

14/08/2012 14:32Posted by Forumguy
What about you? Did you ever wish to work for a company that made one of the games you play?

Most definitely. I've been wanting to work for Blizzard for years now, however neither of the positions I'm interested in have been open when I've checked (I've been checking once every day for a few years). ^^ I will apply later on either way. :)
@Mücke

Spoken like someone who has collected multiple t-shirts. Herding cats is about the same difficulty level as managing an IT team and neither is as difficult as developing and maintaining a software system that has to satisfy most of the users most of the time. I'm glad I'm not a developer anymore.

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